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In This Issue:
Sunday Internet Auction
Rare Example of Teenie Weenies Original Art in February Comic Auction
An Interview with Donald Kasen of Power Records: "The Action Comes Alive As You Read!"
ComicMarket at Heritage
Employment Opportunities
Around Heritage Auctions
Cover of the Week: Put Some Pants On, Maverick!
Current Auctions
February 6, 2014
Newsletter Archive
Last Issue
Sunday Internet Auction
Sunday Internet Comics Auction Spotlight
Auction Ends:
February 9, 2014
10:00 PM CT

696 lots are offered this week, and all are being sold without reserve!

When do you ever see a complete run of Danger Trail? Well, we've got one this week!
Danger Trail #3 (DC, 1950) Condition: GD/VG.
Yes, the rare #3 is included
Our Four Color selection includes several of the Carl Barks Donald Duck issues.
Four Color #62 Donald Duck (Dell, 1945) CGC FN/VF 7.0 Cream to off-white pages.
"Frozen Gold" by Barks.
And we've got two copies of Incredible Hulk #181.
The Incredible Hulk #181 (Marvel, 1974) CGC VF+ 8.5 Off-white to white pages.
The first full appearance of Wolverine, bub
Other highlights of this week's auction include:
Superman #100 (DC, 1955) CGC VG/FN 5.0 Off-white to white pages. Superman #100 (DC, 1955) CGC VG/FN 5.0 Off-white to white pages.
Anniversary issue. Origin of Superman retold. Shows the covers of issues #1, 25, 50, and 75 on the cover by Win Mortimer. Wayne Boring and Al Plastino art. Overstreet 2013 VG 4.0 value = $478; FN 6.0 value = $717. CGC census 1/14: 28 in 5.0, 32 higher.
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Venus #19 (Timely, 1952) Condition: GD. Venus #19 (Timely, 1952) Condition: GD.
Final issue of the title. Classic horror cover by Bill Everett. Everett art. Cover detached at bottom staple. Minor (3mm) bug chew hole through back cover and most of interior, though outside the panel area. Overstreet 2013 GD 2.0 value = $245.
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Wings Comics #51 (Fiction House, 1944) CGC VF+ 8.5 Cream to off-white pages. Wings Comics #51 (Fiction House, 1944) CGC VF+ 8.5 Cream to off-white pages.
Art by Alex Blum and others. One of only five copies certified by CGC to date. Overstreet 2013 VF 8.0 value = $182; VF/NM 9.0 value = $296. CGC census 1/14: 1 in 8.5, 3 higher.
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Iron Man #55 (Marvel, 1973) CGC VF/NM 9.0 White pages. Iron Man #55 (Marvel, 1973) CGC VF/NM 9.0 White pages.
First appearances of Thanos, Drax the Destroyer, Mentor, Starfox, the Blood Brothers, and Kronos. Jim Starlin story, cover, and art. Overstreet 2013 VF/NM 9.0 value = $550; NM- 9.2 value = $750. CGC census 1/14: 137 in 9.0, 383 higher.
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Daredevil #1 (Marvel, 1964) CGC VG 4.0 Cream to off-white pages. Daredevil #1 (Marvel, 1964) CGC VG 4.0 Cream to off-white pages.
The origin and first appearance of Daredevil and the first appearances of Karen Page and Foggy Nelson. Cover by Jack Kirby and Bill Everett, with interior art by Everett. CGC notes, "One piece of tape on interior cover." Overstreet 2013 VG 4.0 value = $634. CGC census 1/14: 186 in 4.0, 1154 higher.
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The Ghost Rider #1 Don/Maggie Thompson Collection pedigree (Marvel, 1967) CGC VF/NM 9.0 Off-white to white pages. The Ghost Rider #1 Don/Maggie Thompson Collection pedigree (Marvel, 1967) CGC VF/NM 9.0 Off-white to white pages.
Origin and first appearance of the new Ghost Rider (Carter Slade). Dick Ayers cover and art. Overstreet 2013 VF/NM 9.0 value = $227; NM- 9.2 value = $350. CGC census 1/14: 15 in 9.0, 24 higher. From the Donald and Maggie Thompson Collection.
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Floyd Gottfredson and Bill Wright Disney Comics Original Art Group (1970s). Floyd Gottfredson and Bill Wright Disney Comics Original Art Group (1970s).
A group of Disney art, including the Mickey Mouse daily for 7-25-1970 (attributed to Floyd Gottfredson, unsigned; ink, blue pencil, and Zipatone shading film on board, image 17.75" x 5"); preliminary drawings for the covers to Beagle Boys #28 and 36 (attributed to Bill Wright; graphite with red and blue pencil highlights on onionskin paper; #36 has an additional sketch in graphite on onionskin, images range from 6,5" x 10" to 9.75" x 10"' and two preliminary sketches of Goofy, Mickey, Minnie, Donald and his three nephews for a Christmas-themed cover, graphite and blue pencil on onionskin, approximate image size 7" x 9.5". Average Very Good condition.
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Joe Musial Katzenjammer Kids #11 Cover Original Art (David McKay, 1950). Joe Musial Katzenjammer Kids #11 Cover Original Art (David McKay, 1950).
As always, it's the Captain and the Inspector who find themselves on "thin ice" around Hans and Fritz!. This cover, in ink and graphite on Bristol, has an image area of 9" x 13"; the art is in Very Good condition with minor handling wear along the outer borders.
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Charles Schulz Peanuts Jubilee Hardcover Book With Snoopy Sketch and Autograph (Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1975). Charles Schulz Peanuts Jubilee Hardcover Book With Snoopy Sketch and Autograph (Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1975).
Lavish coffee-table book examining Charles Schulz's career as a cartoonist, through his earliest Saturday Evening Post drawings through his Li'l Folks strip and the beginning of the Peanuts strip, with full color Sundays and commentary by Schulz himself. Schulz has sketched Snoopy with a baseball hat and catcher's mitt on the title page, inscribing it "For Wes with friendship — Sparky." The book's dust jacket has one small tear near the lower right corner, with a very minor amount of spotting on the outside page edges; otherwise Excellent, as is the blue marker sketch and inscription.
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Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island Yosemite Sam Production Cel and Background Animation Art Signed by Friz Freleng (Warner Brothers, 1994). Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island Yosemite Sam Production Cel and Background Animation Art Signed by Friz Freleng (Warner Brothers, 1994).
Great Horny Toads! That red-haired rascal Sam takes the spotlight in this fantastic production cel, paired with an original art animation background. From the first full-length Daffy Duck cartoon, produced by Friz Freleng. The cel is boldly signed in black marker by Freleng, and is matted and framed with Plexiglas for an overall size of 19.5" x 16.5". Sam stands 5" tall, and the piece is in Fine condition.
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Browse the entire auction here.
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Rare Example of Teenie Weenies Original Art in February Comic Auction
You would assume that any popular comic strip feature that ran for more than half a century would be well-represented on the collector's market. In the case of the Teenie Weenies, you would be mistaken! The piece in our current auction is just the second one we've ever offered in our thirteen years of auctioning comic art.

We understand that all but very few pieces of William Donahey's original art were donated to the Wisconsin Historical Society and therefore unavailable to collectors. The piece we're currently offering was a gift to artist Carl Ed (of "Harold Teen" fame) by Donahey, and our consignor acquired it from a member of Ed's family.

The Teenie Weenies first appeared in the Chicago Tribune, in either 1912 or 1914 depending on which source you believe. The final page ran on February 2, 1970, a few weeks a day after the artist retired, and the day after his death!

Multiple generations of kids enjoyed the single-panel feature, which was syndicated around the world. There were also a number of licensed Teenie Weenies products. Ron Goulart noted, "Each big panel featured a patiently and meticulously drawn scene of some Teenie Weenie activity, ranging from building a house to swimming in a fish bowl to having a squirrel family over for dinner… Donahey never tired of depicting them amid found objects from the real world – hatboxes, hairbrushes, teacups, penknives, and so on."

Click here for a closer look at this delightful panel, which is being offered without reserve.
William Donahey The Teenie Weenies Hand Colored Sunday Comic Strip Original (Chicago Tribune - NY News Syndicate, undated).
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An Interview with Donald Kasen of Power Records: "The Action Comes Alive As You Read!"
By Barry Sandoval

"Power Records Presents..." If you were a kid in the 1970s, you might be as electrified by hearing those words as this writer was, and is. The concept was ingenious: a Marvel or DC comic story printed on sturdy paper, accompanied by a 45 rpm record that dramatized the adventure. It made the comic stories even more exciting and gave them additional atmosphere, and you could listen to them again and again. It was even fun to listen to them along with friends on a rainy day!

Thirty-three different titles were produced from 1974-1981.

Power Records Covers
The Power Records were a good value for parents at $1.49.
The opportunity to talk to one of the men behind this wonderful series was a chance we just couldn't pass up, and Donald Kasen, the head of Inspired Studios, graciously took the time to answer our questions.

Barry Sandoval: Who had the original idea to do the comic book with the record?

Donald Kasen: That goes back to… I want to say the Fifties, when we [Peter Pan Records] started doing books and recordings. We were actually the first company to do books and recordings of licensed characters. We started out with King Features:  Popeye, Betty Boop, and then we went on to some of the classic characters, the Peter Pans if you will, Snow White, Cinderella, the Gingerbread Man, etc. Then we started licensing other children's characters: Scooby Doo, Flintstones, etc. And then, because I guess superheroes were hot, we got into some of them, and we just kept going. Spider-Man was the most popular, because we did more than one book.

BS: How big were the print runs of the Power Records?

DK: I just had gotten out of college in 1970, so I don't know what the print runs were. A typical one probably was in the 25-50,000 range, but I don't know how many reorders and things like that there were.

[Being just out of college at the time] I was excited about having product that I could relate to, let me put it that way. We didn't do a whole lot of fun stuff for a college kid or a post-college kid, as we were a children's company primarily.  Though [in the mid-1970s] we did get into aerobics just at the beginning, and we were blessed to grab a hold of that very hot category.

Power Records PR-10 Interior
This was great in the comic but even much scarier on the record: John Jameson's transformation into Man-Wolf. From the first book-and-record of the series, PR-10, adapted from Amazing Spider-Man #124.
BS: While your first group of records adapted existing comic stories, the later ones were new stories, many of which were written and drawn by the Neal Adams studio. How did the contact to Adams come about?

DK: It happened from.  --  I think -- Conan. I actually went to Neal's studio and met Neal, and used to fight with him in a nice way. Banter is probably a better word than fight. We bantered back and forth, and he was quite a character. I was a kid, and I didn't know anything. I didn't know who Neal Adams was, he was just another artist! It was kind of funny. I loved his work… who didn't? The guy's a really talented artist.

BS: Were you told whether art was done by Adams personally, or which artist did what?

DK: A lot of times we didn't know who the artist was. If it wasn't Neal it might have been somebody at his studio.

BS: I noticed the Planet of the Apes issues say "Arvid Knudsen studio" on there, and those are drawn in a different style, so those must not have gone through Neal Adams for whatever reason.

DK: Arvid was our in-house director. We did have some in-house artists, but he was more of an art director.

BS: I saw your name in the creative credits for PR-36, the Holo-Man issue.

DK: That is true! I got into holography. The guy I became friends with, he and I created the Holo-Man book. We got it into the museum of holography on Mercer Street in New York. The artist was Joe Giella. This brings back some cool memories!

BS: Were the Power Records made for teens, or kids, or college kids, or who did you think was going to be the buyers?

DK: Since they were comic-style, we felt it would relate to kids and young teens.

BS: Some of the first ones had monster themes and were actually pretty scary.

DK: Yeah, we had done a whole Halloween line that we were very successful with. We had some monster albums that we did pretty well with. So we kind of extended it out to licensing characters, I think it was an outgrowth of that.

Power Records PR-16 Interior
Not something you'd associate with kiddie fare: a clown committing suicide! Power Records PR-16, adapted from Man-Thing #5.
BS: Do you know which ones were the bestselling issues, or bestselling characters?

DK: No. Just an educated guess, knowing what I know about the company and everything, I would say the most successful ones were the ones that we did multiple versions of, like Star Trek, Spider-Man, and Batman. When you're successful, you keep on going!

BS: There are a few that show up on the list of "also available" titles that apparently never came out: Moby Dick, Last of the Mohicans, and Gulliver's Travels (PR-38, PR-43, and PR-44).

DK: How do you know they never came out?

BS: As far as any collector knows, they're not out there, that's why I'm curious.

DK: I think Moby Dick we did do, and Gulliver's Travels I think we did also! I'm going to research that! You've got me going now.

BS: That would give collectors a lot of hope! There are also two numbers that are skipped in the numbering, PR-22 and PR-23.

DK: Wow! They might have been two titles that were planned releases that we never came out with.

Power Records Back Interior
If you had any of these as a kid, chances are you listened to them over and over.
BS: The Power Records name was used on the early ones, and then at some point the rest were all just under Peter Pan Records. Do you know why you went away from that Power Records name?

DK: No. I don't know the answer to that. I loved the name Power Records.

BS: Another thing that I've wondered about is that you'll often see ones that are still in their shrinkwrap but the corners are clipped off. How does that come about?

DK: Those are closeouts. At the end of the license you end up closing them out.

BS: So you're basically selling off your overstock?

DK: Yeah, you're given a period of time to sell off the remaining inventory. That's what they are.

BS: And so who clips the corners off of them?

DK: We do. That was the industry standard at the time when you closed out the product.

BS: It's just so retailers know the difference between something that's closeout and not closeout?

DK: Yeah.

BS: The early ones have a price stamped on them of $1.49 and then at some point the circle is just blank. Sometimes you'd see a price sticker on top of that blank circle.

DK: Where are you getting these [questions], that's great!  It was probably a request by the customer.

BS: I assume that you stopped doing the book and record sets because they weren't selling anymore at some point?

DK: Yeah. I guess the industry at that time got soft and it no longer sold enough.

BS: I understand Peter Pan Records was started by your father, is that correct?

DK: My father and uncle. My uncle passed away in 1970 or '71 and my dad passed away in '81. So the two sons, my cousin and I, took over the company. I bought my cousin out in 1989.

BS: Is Inspired Studios, which you run today, the same company as Peter Pan?

DK: Yes. I changed the name of the company in 2006. I just keep the brands: 18 record and 4 video labels. I'm in the process of cataloging all my stuff: 25,000 recordings and the books with the recordings, going back to the 1930s, getting them and digitizing them. In today's world it's converting to CDs, MP3s, and mobile apps. I try and get really talented artists to do stuff.
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ComicMarket
ComicMarket is our fixed-price service, featuring CGC-graded comics consigned by members of Heritage's ComicMarket Network. Heritage acts as a broker and escrow agent for any transaction by making comics from third-party sellers available to our customers in one location.

If you ever think a price is too high on a ComicMarket item, Heritage is happy to relay counter-offers, just use the Make An Offer button on the item page.

New items are added daily. To see the newest listings, just click here.

Available right this minute at HA.com:
The Incredible Hulk #109 (Marvel, 1968) CGC NM/MT 9.8 WHITE pages.
The Incredible Hulk #109 (Marvel, 1968) CGC NM/MT 9.8 WHITE pages.


Young Allies Comics #10 (Timely, 1943) CGC VF- 7.5 Light tan to off-white pages.
Young Allies Comics #10 (Timely, 1943) CGC VF- 7.5 Light tan to off-white pages.


Red Sonja V2#1 (Marvel, 1983) CGC NM/MT 9.8 White pages.
Red Sonja V2#1 (Marvel, 1983) CGC NM/MT 9.8 White pages.
Solo Avengers #7 (Marvel, 1988) CGC NM/MT 9.8 WHITE pages.
Solo Avengers #7 (Marvel, 1988) CGC NM/MT 9.8 WHITE pages.
Browse the entire selection at HA.com/CM.

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Employment Opportunities
As the fastest growing American-based auction house, financially rock-solid Heritage Auctions continues to grow and seek the best talent in the industry. If you are a specialist or have strong general collectibles knowledge, we want to hear from you. These specialists will, in some cases, head new departments and in others will enhance existing department expertise. We have positions open at our headquarters in Dallas as well as at our new state-of-the-art galleries in prime locations in both Midtown Manhattan and Beverly Hills.

Heritage is seeking to hire the world's best specialists in the following categories:
  • Asian Art Specialist
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  • Modern & Contemporary Art Specialist: (New York, Beverly Hills)
  • World Coins Director: Hong Kong
If you are interested and feel you have the qualifications we seek, please email your resume and salary history to Experts@HA.com.

We are also seeking to fill the following corporate positions:
  • Client Services Representative
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If you are interested in applying for one of these Corporate positions, please apply here.

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Around Heritage Auctions
Babe Ruth's 1923 World Series Championship Watch, Thought Lost To History, Surfaces For Public Auction

1923 New York Yankees World Championship Watch Presented to Babe Ruth.
The 1923 New York Yankees World Championship Watch presented to Babe Ruth, the most iconic American athlete of all, will cross the auction block on Feb. 22, as part of Heritage Auctions' Sports Platinum Night Auction at the Fletcher-Sinclair Mansion, 2 E. 79th Street. It is estimated at $750,000+.

"As the Babe's personal award for the first World Championship in New York Yankees franchise history, I believe that this is the most important piece of New York Yankees memorabilia that exists," said Chris Ivy, Director of Sports Collectibles at Heritage Auctions. "This championship watch, which was thought lost to time, will now take its rightful place as one of the crown jewels of sports memorabilia. Based on prices realized for similar historic championship hardware, I wouldn't be surprised to see it far exceed our preliminary auction estimate."

The watch was awarded to the Babe, and all of his New York Yankees teammates, when they bested the crosstown rival New York Giants in six games and where Ruth had a fantastic series, batting .368 and dinging three homers.

"More importantly for history, 1923 was the inauguration of the single greatest sports dynasty in history," said Ivy, "the first World Series victory for a franchise that has garnered 27 to date and is one of the most popular teams in the world, period. This is the official and only award presented to George Herman 'Babe' Ruth for his contributions in claiming that first trophy. It's simply unbelievable."

While Heritage has sold three other watches awarded to players on the legendary team, none can even begin to compare in importance to this one. Ruth's was believed lost to history.

Here's the real story: For the first quarter century of its existence, the pocket watch remained with Ruth as one of his most significant possessions. As his terminal cancer progressed later in his life, however, he asked his close friend Charlie Schwefel if he might want anything from his collection to remember him by.

"Schwefel, a wealthy Manhattan hotelier and an important figure in the New York boxing scene," said Ivy, "asked for his dying friend's pocket watch."

As noted in the letter of provenance from Lewis Fern, the watch remained in Schwefel's possession for just two years before his wife gave it to her nephew, Lewis Fern, with the comment that "this should have been yours all along." Fern had also befriended Ruth and caddied many times for the Babe at St. Alban's Golf Club in Queens, New York. He kept the watch for decades until it was privately sold into one of the finest sports collections in the world in 1988, where it has remained hidden away until now.

The watch is a 14 karat gold "Gruen Verithin" beauty in unique pentagonal format. The verso is engraved with a miniature scene of a pitcher, hitter and catcher, and a ball in flight in their midst. Framing the scene are the historic words, "Yankees, World's Champions 1923." The "Babe Ruth" engraving at the upper edge was added by Ruth just prior to gifting the symbolic memento to Schwefel. The rear case pops open to reveal further engraving, most notably the original text announcing, "Presented by Baseball Commissioner to George H. Ruth." Just above we find the rest of Ruth's late 1940s addition, reading, "To My Pal Charles Schwefel."

More information about Sports auctions.

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"Doodle for Hunger" Online Auction Benefits St. Francis Food Pantries and Shelters

February 24 Doodle for Hunger Comic & Illustration Art Auction Benefiting St. Francis Food Pantries and Shelters #559
"Doodle for Hunger" is a fun online auction of signed original works of art by comic artists and illustrators. Highlights of the auction include illustration art and sketches from acclaimed cartoonists, political caricaturists, and children's books authors. The auction will benefit St. Francis Food Pantries and Shelters. St. Francis Food Pantries and Shelters supports a network of charitable programs that provide a broad range of services for those in need, including the provision of food, clothing, shelter, and related social services. The auction is offered on the internet only and will close February 24, 2014 10PM CT. For more information, contact Stephanie O'Barr, 800-872-6476 ext. 1807 or StephanieO@HA.com.

More information about Charity auctions.

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Cover of the Week: Put Some Pants On, Maverick!
Do we see what we think we see here?
Four Color #892 Maverick (Dell, 1958) Condition: VF.
No, it turns out Bret Maverick is indeed wearing pants, though pants of a flesh-colored variety.
Four Color #892 Maverick (Dell, 1958) Condition: VF.
You can garner a copy of Four Color #892 here.

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Current Auctions
Comic & Comic Art Auctions
February 20 - 22 Vintage Comics & Comic Art Signature Auction - New York #7087
February 20 - 22 Vintage Comics & Comic Art Signature Auction - New York #7087
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Sunday Internet Comics Auction
Sunday Comics
February 9
Signature Auctions
February 6 Artists Against Alzheimer's Benefiting A.W.A.R.E. Charity Auction - Dallas #565 February 6 Artists Against Alzheimer's Benefiting A.W.A.R.E. Charity Auction - Dallas #565
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February 15 Vintage Guitars & Musical Instruments Signature Auction - Beverly Hills #7102 February 15 Vintage Guitars & Musical Instruments Signature Auction - Beverly Hills #7102
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February 15 Fine & Rare Wine Signature Auction - Beverly Hills #5182 February 15 Fine & Rare Wine Signature Auction - Beverly Hills #5182
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February 21 - 23 Fine & Decorative Arts Including Estates Signature Auction - Dallas #5155 February 21 - 23 Fine & Decorative Arts Including Estates Signature Auction - Dallas #5155
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February 22 - 23 Sports Collectibles Platinum Night Auction - New York #7100 February 22 - 23 Sports Collectibles Platinum Night Auction - New York #7100
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February 24 Doodle for Hunger Comic & Illustration Art Auction Benefiting St. Francis Food Pantries and Shelters - Dallas #559 February 24 Doodle for Hunger Comic & Illustration Art Auction Benefiting St. Francis Food Pantries and Shelters - Dallas #559
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Other Internet Auctions
Weekly World Coin Auction
Thursday World Coin
February 6
Weekly Internet Rare Books and Autographs Auctions
Thursday Books
February 6
Sunday Internet Coin Auction
Sunday Coins
February 9
Sunday Internet Movie Poster Auction
Sunday Movie Posters
February 9
Weekly Internet Sports Collectables Auction
Sunday Sports
February 9
Weekly Currency Auction
Tuesday Currency
February 11
Tuesday Internet Coin Auction
Tuesday Coins
February 11
Tuesday Internet Watch & Jewelry Auction
Tuesday Jewelry
February 11
Weekly Internet Luxury Accessory Auction
Tuesday Luxury
February 11
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